Chicana/o Studies – Publishing an Alternative View Since 1970 – CSU, Northridge

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El Popo Staff

El Popo Staff has 141 articles published.

Federal Government Creates Fear in Family Separation Policy

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    A new policy approved by ICE would separate families detained at the U.S.-Mexico border and target parents who try to retrieve their children from immigration detention centers. (Photo: @NIJC/Twitter)

by Elizabeth Valdez

The Federal Government has deliberate fear among immigrants by separating families.

Parents and their children are the main victims. Reports indicate that children less than the age of one are separated by their parents and placed into foster care. The act of taking children away from their families also result in psychological trauma as such that children will have to live the rest of their lives in fear of never seeing their parents.

More than 2,300 children have been separated. The number of children exposed to this trauma will have to live with the memories of losing their parents. The psychological impact these children will have to go through will not only affect the way they think, but they way they behave as well. According to The Washington Post’s What Separation from Parents Does to Children, “Those separated from their parents at a young age had much less white matter, which is largely made up of fibers that transmit information throughout the brain, as well as less gray matter, which contains the brain-cell bodies that process information and solve problems.”

Children are separated from their parents as migrants cross the border. They are not allowed to be held in a federal jail due to our policies, so instead they are taken from their parents and placed in the care of the Office of Refugee Resettlement.

It first started on March 7, 2017, when the Secretary of Homeland Security, John Kelly confirmed in a report that the administration is considering separating families at the border. On April 20, 2018 a news report claimed that more than 700 children had been taken from their parents since October of the previous year. Moreover,100 of those 700 are under the age of 4. 

The Trump administration started a “zero tolerance” policy on the southwest border that started on April 6. After many months, it finally ended when Trump signed an executive order designed to keep migrant families together at the U.S.-Mexico border because of ACLU lawsuits. However, many children have yet to be reunited with their parents. Litigation is continuing.

How can we stop this from happening again…

A few of the things we can do are:

1.Donate money to charities that help those families getting affected

2. Call our representatives because they are the ones they represent what we want to happen.

3. Find a local protest so your voice gets heard.

4. Inform others so that everyone as a whole can make a change.

Street Vendors Need To Earn A Living

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by Guadalupe Canales

Four years ago, a vote to legalize street vending in Los Angeles was completed, but why has not action been taken?

Living with the fear that they receive a one thousand dollar citation, and or be discriminated, assaulted, or robbed many still take on this job.

Street vendors rely on this job to help them provide for their families, and for immigrants, it is one of the only jobs they can do to earn a living. Street vending is known to be one of the few jobs immigrants are able to take on because of their status, but many vendors have not seen any change toward legalization or protection of street vendors.

In this past year, we have seen discrimination and violence towards street vendors more than ever before. With Trump serving as president many fear to go out and do their jobs because of the challenges they face not only with discrimination but also with deportations and fines. Recently, the city council voted 11-4, to draft a policy for street vending. This project has been targeted as a priority in hopes to make a proposal by summer.

If a proposal is passed, we will see the city take action as soon as next year. The proposal is set to regulate where street vendors will be allowed to sell. Street vending will be banned 500 feet from busy venues including Dodger Stadium, Staples Center, Hollywood Bowl and many other crowded locations. Each vendor will have to apply for a permit and they will have assigned locations. The idea is to minimize groups of street vendors, only two street vendors per each side of a city block will be allowed.

The delay has been in part to local property owners who do not want street vendors around their establishments, as well as undecided council members who cannot decide on restrictions that should be applied for street vendors safety and for the safety of the communities.

Until then, street vendors have to wait and see if city council will have a proposal by July to stop living in fear, for not only their lives but also for the sake of their families.

The Other Side of the Tracks

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by Gonzo K.O.

It was the middle of the night when I heard a loud noise that woke me up.

Bang! Bang! Bang!

It brought back the memories.

I got out of bed and immediately went to make sure my dog was okay.

I knew already what the noise was without having to second guess, it was gunshots.

Growing up in an area that is not safe was a common thing to hear this noise. Around fourth of July our neighborhood child game was “firework or gunshot”.

As I went near a window, I could hear the neighborhood wake up to see what was going on (I love being Latina because everyone is in everyone’s business and loves to snoop and be a chismoso). I, of course, joined in and went outside.

The scene I was about to walk in was not a good one.

It was dark, and it was unclear at first what had happened, but there was something on the ground, not moving.

There the person was shot, lifeless and facing up at the sky almost as if pleading with a higher power. There was a man shot, he did not look older than 25, and he was dead. As per usual, the cops did not come until an hour after and the neighborhood had to see this. A young man shot to death by gun violence. It was not surprising to me how there was another body in the streets while his body ran down the street.

Now that isn’t something that should be normal, we shouldn’t be so numb to dead bodies and violence that it doesn’t phase us but that is the case not living in a nice neighborhood.

Since I was a child, I was told do not walk down a certain street, do not go to the park at night. As a child hearing this, I thought this was the norm, I thought this is how all children grew up. It was not until I went to a school outside of my neighborhood that I realized this was not  the case, I had other school friends parents not wanting to come over or even let them sleep over and realized it was because of the place I was living in.

I was the child from the poor, gun violence, gang violent streets.

So as I stood there watching from my yard with my family as the police finally arrived, I can see it in the neighbors faces, we are all use to this, we all can see gun violence and gang violence and not be afraid of it. As I was thinking I could overhead another neighbors conversation, “if that was my son I would have beat his ass for being associated with gangs.” I could see a tattoo on the body that was from a well known gang as I heard the women’s conversation.

Are we immune to this? Is this our normal?

I went to school the next day and told my classmates I was super tired since I had a long night because someone got shot. They looked at me with surprised eyes as I said this without any sadness or fear in my voice.

They asked me for details and when I told them it was from gang violence and the man died, I could see them physically back away from me and try to go somewhere else. We’re they too sensitive? Did I say something wrong? I did not understand.

I talked with my mom later that day and she told me there is stuff that people do not live through so they don’t understand how to handle those situations. I could see my mom had a point, there was no way I could bring this up at my school on the other side of the train tracks in the nice area without being looked at as a freak or a thug.

Is this why I do not see a need for gun control? I know if those gangs wanted guns they would get them. Why is it an issue now? Why was it not an issue when I was a child having to duck when I heard gunshots? Or the first time I saw a dead body from gang violence? Why is this an issue now? Guns have always been here, but when it crosses over the train tracks ,it becomes a big issue. So are they really doing this for the people? Or are they doing this because the gun violence is now in their backyards?

There’s Always Help Out There: A Podcast With My Therapist

in Podcasts by
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by Jose Medrano

After dealing with depression for a few years, I decided Spring of 2017 that I would finally make the effort to see a therapist.

I was tired of dealing with feelings of self-loathing and losing my sense of self. However, this might have been a little easier said than done. When my local clinic first referred me to a therapist, the therapist had a ridiculously limited schedule which didn’t work well with my school schedule, so I was not able to ever have a meeting with him. Later that Summer, I went to another clinic that accepted my insurance  and covered mental health services. Unfortunately at that clinic, my first appointment was mailed to me without any prior discussion, and it also conflicted with my school schedule.

When I tried to call them to reschedule, they would never answer regardless of what day or time of the week I called. I was also too busy to go in to the clinic myself because of school. This past February, I brought up this struggle to my doctor, and she assigned me a case worker who made it their priority to find me a good therapist. Within one week of talking to my doctor, I was reached out to and was able to schedule my therapy at a convenient time for me. Of course, I was a little bit nervous to finally begin such a major step towards good mental health, but it’s a step that many of us need to take.

I sat down with my therapist, JC, and asked him a few questions about why therapy is important to him and how he feels he is making a difference as a therapist.

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